A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Depression

According to what I have heard, thou hast experienced a great financial loss. Do not feel sorry, for thou wilt be compensated. I hope that whatever thou hast lost will come back to thee. But this material loss is not a very grave one; it is for a time and shall pass away. Alhamdallah! [Praise be to God!]—that thou hast a share in the Kingdom of God and art receiving gifts from the treasury of the Holy Spirit. Do not feel sorry; do not brood over the loss; do not sit down depressed; do not be silent; but, on the contrary, day and night be engaged in the commemoration of thy Lord in the greatest joy and gladness.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Tablets of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá v1, p. 132)


Be not the slave of your moods, but their master. But if you are so angry, so depressed and so sore that your spirit cannot find deliverance and peace even in prayer, then quickly go and give some pleasure to someone lowly or sorrowful, or to a guilty or innocent sufferer! Sacrifice yourself, your talent, your time, your rest to another, to one who has to bear a heavier load than you.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, source unknown)


Be thou not unhappy; the tempest of sorrow shall pass; regret will not last; disappointment will vanish; the fire of the love of God will become enkindled, and the thorns and briars of sadness and despondency will be consumed! Be thou happy; rest thou assured upon the favors of Bahá‘, so that uncertainty and hesitation may become non-existent and the invisible outpourings descend upon the arena of being!
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Tablets of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá v3, p. 557)


But these episodes shall pass away, while that abiding glory and eternal life shall remain unchanged forever. Moreover, these afflictions shall be the cause of great advancement.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Selections from the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 238-239)


Eschew anxiety (al-hamma) and depression (al-ghamm) for through these twain will transpire a darksome affliction (Bahá’u’lláh, Tablet of Medicine)


He urges you to put these dark thoughts from your mind, and remember that God, the Creator of all men, can bear to see them suffer so, it is not for us to question His wisdom. He can compensate the innocent, in His own way, for the afflictions they bear.
(Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 237)


If we are not happy and joyous at this season, for what other season shall we wait and for what other time shall we look?
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Bahá’í World Faith, p. 351)


In truth were man to attain the stage of certitude in his spiritual development, no affliction could ever depress his spirits, though he would undoubtedly be influenced by reason of his human susceptibilities. Nevertheless, man’s inner being will be so revived by the breeze of divinely-ordained woes and trials that the dust of wailing and lamentation will entirely subside and the light of submissive resignation unto His Will shall shine forth like unto a radiant morn.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Fire and Light, p. 25)


The confirmations of God are supporting you, the succor of God is at hand: why do you not cry out and exult with all your heart, and strive with all your soul!
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Secret of Divine Civilization, p. 104)


There is a tremendous darkness in the world today, the darkness caused by mankind’s going against the Laws of God and giving way to the animal side of human nature. People must recognize this fact, and consciously struggle against pessimism and depression.
(Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 113)


To engage in some profession is highly commendable, for when occupied with work one is less likely to dwell on the unpleasant aspects of life.
(Bahá’u’lláh, Tablets of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 175)


"You also ask what one should do to ‘handle depression and anger with someone’ one feels ‘very positively about‘. The Universal House of Justice suggests that you call to mind the admonitions found in our writings on the need to overlook the shortcomings of others, to forgive and conceal their misdeeds, not to expose their bad qualities, but to search for and affirm their praiseworthy ones, and endeavour to be always forbearing, patient, and merciful. Such passages as the following extract from one of the letter written on behalf of the beloved Guardian by his secretary will also be helpful: Each of us is responsible for one life only, and that is our own. Each of us is immeasurably far from being “perfect as our Heavenly Father is perfect: and the task of perfecting our own life and character is one that requires all our attention, our will-power and energy... On no subject are the Bahá’í teachings more emphatic that on the necessity to abstain from fault-finding, while being ever eager to discover and root out our own faults and overcome our own failings.
(Universal House of Justice, Lights of Guidance, p. 90-91)


You ask in your letter for guidance on the implications of the prohibitions on backbiting and more specifically whether, in moments of anger or depression, the believer is permitted to turn to his friends to unburden his soul and discuss his problem in human relations. Normally, it is possible to describe the situation surrounding a problem and seek help and advice in resolving it, without necessarily mentioning names. The individual believer should seek to do this, whether he is consulting a friend, Bahá’í or non-Bahá’í, or whether the friend is consulting him.
(Universal House of Justice, Lights of Guidance, p. 90)


You should never be too depressed about your dissatisfaction concerning not finding a job you like, a place in the world that fits you. If you analyse it this general sense of mis-fit is one of the curses of your generation, one of the products of the world’s disequilibrium and chaos. It is not confined to your life, it is pretty general.
(Shoghi Effendi, The Unfolding Destiny of the British Bahá’í Community, p. 454)