A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Food

At whatever time highly-skilled physicians shall have developed the healing of illnesses by means of foods, and shall make provision for simple foods, and shall prohibit humankind from living as slaves to their lustful appetites, it is certain that the incidence of chronic and diversified illnesses will abate, and the general health of all mankind will be much improved. This is destined to come about.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 295)


But eating meat is not forbidden or unlawful, nay, the point is this, that it is possible for man to live without eating meat and will be strong. Meat is nourishing and containeth the elements of herbs, seeds and fruits; therefore sometimes it is essential for the sick and for the rehabilitation of health. There is no objection in the Law of God to the eating of meat if it is required. So if thy constitution is rather weak and thou findest meat useful, thou mayest eat it.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 295)


But man begins little by little to accustom himself to poison, by taking a small quantity each day, and gradually increasing it, until he reaches such a point that he cannot live without …
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Bahá’í World Faith, p. 320)


But now coming to man, we see he hath neither hooked teeth nor sharp nails or claws, nor teeth like iron sickles. From this it becometh evident and manifest that the food of man is cereals and fruit. Some of the teeth of man are like millstones to grind the grain, and some sharp to cut the fruit. Therefore he is not in need of meat, nor is he obliged to eat it. Even without eating meat he would with the utmost vigour and energy. For example, the community of the Brahmins in India do not eat meat; notwithstanding this they are not inferior to other nations in strength, power, vigour, outward senses or intellectual virtues.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 294)


Eat ye, O people, of the good things which God hath allowed you, and deprive not yourselves from His wondrous bounties. Render thanks and praise unto Him, and be of them that are truly thankful.
(Adib Taherzadeh, The Covenant of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 21-22)


God has created all men in such a manner, and has given them such a constitution and such capacities, that they are benefited by sugar and honey, and harmed and destroyed by poison.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Bahá’í World Faith, p. 320)


In all circumstances they should conduct themselves with moderation; if the meal be only one course this is more pleasing in the sight of God; however, according to their means, they should seek to have this single dish be of good quality.
(Bahá’u’lláh, Lights of Guidance, p. 294)


In matters of diet … the believers should be aware that a huge body of scientific knowledge has accumulated as a guide to our habits an practices. Here too, as in all other things, the believers should be conscious of the two principles of moderation and courtesy in the way they express their opinions and in deciding whether they should refuse food offered to them or request special food.
(Universal House of Justice, Lights of Guidance, p. 297-298)


In regard to the question as to whether people ought to kill animals for food of not, there is no explicit statement in the Bahá’í Sacred Scriptures (as far as I know) in favor or against it. It is certain, however, that if man can live on a purely vegetarian diet and thus avoid killing animals, it would be much preferable.
(Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 295)


No specific school of nutrition or medicine has been associated with the Bahá’í teachings. What we have are certain guidelines, indications and principles which will be carefully studied by expert and will, in the years ahead, undoubtedly prove to be invaluable sources of guidance and inspiration in the development of these medical sciences.
(Universal House of Justice, Lights of Guidance, p. 297)


The child must, from the day of his birth, be provided with whatever is conducive to his health; and ye know this: so far as possible, the mother’s milk is best for, more agreeable and better suited to, the child, unless she should fall ill or her milk should run entirely dry.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 294)


There are, of course, instances where a believer would be fully justified in abstaining from or eating only certain foods for some medical reason, but this is a different matter and would be understood by any reasonable person.
(Universal House of Justice, Lights of Guidance, p. 298)


There is nothing in the teachings about whether people should eat their food cooked or raw; exercise or not exercise; resort to specific therapies or not; nor is it forbidden to eat meat.
(Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 298)


Thou hast written regarding the four canine teeth in man, saying that these teeth, two in the upper jaw and two in the lower, are for the purpose of eating meat. Know thou that these four teeth are not created for meat-eating, although one can eat meat with them. All the teeth of man are made for eating fruit, cereals and vegetables. These four teeth, however, are designed for breaking hard shells, such as those of almonds.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 295)


Truly, the killing of animals and the eating of their meat is somewhat contrary to pity and compassion, and if one can content oneself with cereals, fruit, oil and nuts, such as pistachios, almonds and so on, it would undoubtedly be better and more pleasing.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 295)


What will be the food of the future? Fruit and grains. The time will come when meat will no longer be eaten. Medical science is only in its infancy, yet it has shown that our natural diet is that which grows out of the ground. The people will gradually develop up to the condition of this natural food.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 295)