A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Health Practitioners

The Guardian knows nothing about your kind of healing, nor would he care to go into the question in detail, as he has no time for such matters. But he can lay down for your guidance certain broad principles: there is no such thing as Bahá’í healers or a Bahá’í type of healing. In His Most Holy Book (the “Aqdas") Bahá’u’lláh says to consult the best physicians, in other words doctors who have studied a scientific system of medicine; He never gave us to believe He Himself would heal us through “healers", but rather through prayer and the assistance of medicine and approved treatments. Now, as long as your healing is in no opposition to these principles, as long as you do not try and take the place of a regular doctor in trying to heal others, but only give them your kind of help through constructive suggestion—or whatever it may be—and do not associate this help with being a channel of the direct grace of Bahá’u’lláh, the Guardian sees no harm in your continuing your assistance to others. But you must conscientiously decide whether, in view of the above, you are really justified in continuing. He will pray for your guidance and happiness.
(The Universal House of Justice, 1998 Dec 16, Traditional practices in Africa)


The statement defining health practitioners from a Bahá’í point of view is given in a letter written on behalf of the Guardian to an individual believer on 8 June 1948: “In His Most Holy Book (the “Aqdas") Bahá’u’lláh says to consult the best physicians, in other words doctors who have studied a scientific system of medicine.” It is clear from other statements made by the Guardian, as well as from the practice of Bahá’u’lláh, the Master and the Guardian himself, that by “a scientific system of medicine” he was not limiting the choice to the medical theories currently dominant in western countries. The House of Justice, therefore, does not exclude the use of traditional native healers, who have often gone through a rigorous training in their craft. There is, nevertheless, an important borderline between unorthodox medical practice and sheer quackery or superstition, and this we should be careful not to cross.
(The Universal House of Justice, 1998 Dec 16, Traditional practices in Africa)