A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Illness

A man living with his thoughts in this Kingdom knows perpetual joy. The ills all flesh is heir to do not pass him by, but they only touch the surface of his life, the depths are calm and serene.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Paris Talks, p. 109)


As you know, Bahá’u’lláh has ordained that in case of illness we should always consult the most competent physicians….For prayer alone is not sufficient. To render it more effective we have to make use of all the physical and material advantages which God has given us.
(Shoghi Effendi, Throne of the Inner Temple, p 76)


Assemblies may wish to consider establishing a task force for such pastoral care activities as visiting the sick, the bereaved, the elderly or otherwise home-bound members of the community, and encourage individual initiative in providing home visits, especially to those who may be unable to participate in community life otherwise. Offering to conduct a study circle or devotional gathering in the home of such believers, if they are well enough, and asking them to invite friends and family can invigorate and encourage them in the Faith, draw families and communities closer together, and be a rich source of healing fellowship for everyone involved. Likewise, offering a helpful service or performing an everyday task for one who is infirm or ill can be of enormous assistance and encouragement, reducing the sense of isolation and helplessness often experienced by the sufferer in such circumstances.
(USA- NSA, Guidelines for Local Spiritual Assemblies, Chapter 14, p. 5)



For the mind to manifest itself, the human body must be whole; and a sound mind cannot be but in a sound body, whereas the soul dependeth not upon the body.
(?bdu’l-Bahá, “Tablet to August Forel", in The Bahá’í World, 1968-1973, Vol. XV, pp. 37-43)


If we are caused joy or pain by a friend, if a love prove true or false, it is the soul that is affected. If our dear ones are far from us—it is the soul that grieves, and the grief or trouble of the soul may react on the body. Thus, when the spirit is fed with holy virtues, then is the body joyous; if the soul falls into sin, the body is in torment! When we find truth, constancy, fidelity, and love, we are happy; but if we meet with lying, faithlessness, and deceit, we are miserable. These are all things pertaining to the soul, and are not bodily ills.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Paris Talks, p. 65)


If we are sick and in distress let us implore God’s healing, and He will answer our prayer.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Paris Talks, p. 111)


O thou servant of God! To look after the sick is one of the greatest duties. For every soul who becomes sick, the other friends should certainly offer their lives (in service) with the utmost kindness.
(?bdu’l-Bahá, Tablets of ?bdu’l-Bahá, Vol. I, p. 149)


Often physical illness draws man nearer to his Maker, suffers the heart to be made empty of all worldly desires until it becomes tender and sympathetic toward all sufferers and compassionate to all creatures. Although physical diseases cause man to suffer temporarily, yet they do not touch his spirit. Nay, rather, they contribute toward the divine purpose; that is, spiritual susceptibilities will be created in his heart.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, )


Regarding your questions concerning the condition of the soul during illness: The passages in the"Gleanings” make it quite clear that physical ailments, no matter how severe, cannot bring any change in the inherent condition of the soul. As Bahá’u’lláh says: ‘The spirit is permanent and steadfast in its station’. The veil or hindrance that interposes between soul and body during physical disease is sickness itself. Sickness reveals a lack of balance in the human organism, an absence of equilibrium in the forces essential for the normal functioning of the human body.
(Shoghi Effendi, The Compilation of Compilations, Vol. I, no. 1061)


Such hindrances (i.e. illness and other difficulties) no matter how severe and insuperable they may at first seem, can and should be effectively overcome through the combined and sustained power of prayer and of determined and continued effort.
(Shoghi Effendi, Throne of the Inner Temple, p. 69)


Verily, Thy illness caused Me sorrow, but God will cure Thee, and He is the most generous and best helper.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Bahá’í World Faith, p. 436)


We should all visit the sick. When they are in sorrow and suffering, it is a real help and benefit to have a friend come. Happiness is a great healer to those who are ill. In the East it is the custom to call upon the patient often and meet him individually. The people in the East show the utmost kindness and compassion to the sick and suffering. This has greater effect than the remedy itself. You must always have this thought of love and affection when you visit the ailing and afflicted.
(?bdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 204)


Whenever ye fall ill, refer to competent physicians. Verily, We have not abolished recourse to material means, rather have We affirmed it through this Pen which God hath made the Dawning Place of His luminous and resplendent Cause.
(Bahá’u’lláh, The Throne of the Inner Temple, p 78)