A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Judgementalism

All religions teach that we should love one another; that we should seek out our own shortcomings before we presume to condemn the faults of others, that we must not consider ourselves superior to our neighbours! We must be careful not to exalt ourselves lest we be humiliated.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Paris Talks, p. 147)


Let us therefore be humble, without prejudices, preferring others’ good to our own! Let us never say, ‘I am a believer but he is an infidel‘, ‘I am near to God, whilst he is an outcast‘. We can never know what will be the final judgment! Therefore let us help all who are in need of any kind of assistance. Let us teach the ignorant, and take care of the young child until he grows to maturity. When we find a person fallen into the depths of misery or sin we must be kind to him, take him by the hand, help him to regain his footing, his strength; we must guide him with love and tenderness, treat him as a friend not as an enemy.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Paris Talks, p. 148)


Therefore, no one should glorify himself over another; no one should manifest pride or superiority toward another; no one should look upon another with scorn and contempt; and no one should deprive or oppress a fellow creature.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 62)


We have no right to look upon any of our fellow-mortals as evil.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Paris Talks, p. 148)


Who are we that we should judge? How shall we know who, in the sight of God, is the most upright man? God’s thoughts are not like our thoughts! How many men who have seemed saint-like to their friends have fallen into the greatest humiliation. Think of Judas Iscariot; he began well, but remember his end! On the other hand, Paul, the Apostle, was in his early life an enemy of Christ, whilst later he became His most faithful servant. How then can we flatter ourselves and despise others?
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Paris Talks, p. 147)


… we denounce one another and plot each other’s ruin, and whenever we wish to put on a show of wisdom and learning, of virtue and godliness, we set about mocking and reviling this one and that. “The ideas of such a one,” we say, “are wide of the mark, and so-and-so’s behavior leaves much to be desired. The religious observances of Zayd are few and far between, and Amr is not firm in his faith. So-and-so’s opinions smack of Europe. Fundamentally, Blank thinks of nothing but his own name and fame. Last night when the congregation stood up to pray, the row was out of line …
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Secret of Divine Civilization, p. 56-57)