A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Nine Pointed Star

In a letter to the Temple Guides Committee, dated 5 December 1944, the Guardian’s secretary stated on his behalf that the nine-pointed star was not a symbol of the Faith in any special sense, but that it was developed by Mr. Bourgeois (the architect of the House of Worship in Wilmette) and other Bahá’ís as a symbol that could be used. Shoghi Effendi also approved the use of the nine-pointed star on Bahá’í gravestones.
(Universal House of Justice, The Nine-Pointed Star: History and Symbolism, 24 January 1999)


Strictly speaking the 5-pointed star is the symbol of our Faith, as used by the Báb and explained by Him. But the Guardian does not feel it is wise or necessary to complicate our explanations of the Temple by adding this.
(Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 415)


The 9-pointed star is not a part of the Teachings of our Faith, but only used as an emblem representing ‘9‘. In telling people of the 9 religions of the world, that is, existing religions, we should not give this as the reason the Temple has 9 sides. This may have been an idea of the architect, and a very pleasing idea, which can be mentioned in passing, but the Temple has 9 sides because of the association of 9 with perfection, unity and ‘Bahá’.
(Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 415)


The 9-pointed star is not a part of the teachings of our Faith, but only used as an emblem representing “9”.... Strictly speaking the 5-pointed star is the symbol of our Faith..…
(Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 415)


The nine-pointed star is regarded by many people, both Bahá’í and non-Bahá’í, as a symbol of the Faith, and hence any use of it should be under conditions which are dignified and appropriate. As you can well understand, problems can readily arise when there are differences of opinion about what constitute such conditions. The House of Justice is reluctant to specify in details what is acceptable, and encourages believers to turn to the National or Local Spiritual Assemblies, or to believers in whose good judgement they nave confidence, for advice on such matters.
(Universal House of Justice, The Nine-Pointed Star: History and Symbolism, 24 January 1999)


We ... have always, following the Guardian’s clear instructions regarding permissible gravestone symbols for Bahá’ís, sought to make clear that any form of the Greatest Name on grave markers is not permitted. The nine-pointed star in its many versions may be used, with such verbal inscription as will fulfill individual needs.
(Universal House of Justice, The Nine-Pointed Star: History and Symbolism, 24 January 1999)


We understand that there are traditions about the placing of a star which have symbolic meanings to the general public and that, generally, it is preferable for the central point of the star to be directed upwards rather than downwards.
(Universal House of Justice, The Nine-Pointed Star: History and Symbolism, 24 January 1999)


We wish to point out that the symbols of the Most Great Name and the nine-pointed star, although Bahá’í symbols, are not in any way the symbols of the Bahá’í Faith in the sense that the cross is the symbol of Christianity or the crescent the symbol of Islam.
(Universal House of Justice, The Nine-Pointed Star: History and Symbolism, 24 January 1999)