A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Reflection

A natural vehicle for multiplying core activities has been reflection meetings. ...In such gatherings the institutions and the believers, many of whom are involved in the institute process, study the relevant Five Year Plan documents, share experiences, and consult on the achievements and strengths within the cluster.
(International Teaching Center, Building Momentum: A Coherent Approach to Growth, in Turning Point, Selected Messages from the Universal House of Justice and Supplemental Material, 1996-2006, par. 52.59)


Although the agencies of the Faith responsible for organizing reflection meetings at the level of the cluster may choose to open them up to individuals who are not Bahá’ís but are close to the Faith, believers without their full administrative rights are not entitled to attend such meetings.
(Universal House of Justice, dated September 30, 2008, to a National Spiritual Assembly)


As learning has come to distinguish the communities mode of operation, certain aspects of decision-making related to expansion and consolidation have been assigned to the body of the believers, enabling planning and implementation to become more responsive to circumstances on the ground. Specifically, a space has been created, in the agency of the reflection meeting, for those engaged in activities that the cluster level to assemble from time to time in order to reach consensus on the current status of their situation, in light of experience and guidance from the institutions, and to determine their immediate steps forward.
(Universal House of Justice, Ridván 2010)


If learning is to be the primary mode of operation in a community, then visions, strategies, goals and methods have to be examined time and again. As tasks are accomplished, obstacles removed, resources multiplied and lessons learned, modifications have to be made in goals and approaches, but in a way that continuity of action is maintained.
(The Institution of the Counsellors, a document prepared for the Universal House of Justice, p. 24)


Key to the progress of an intensive program of growth is the phase dedicated to reflection, in which the lessons learned in action are articulated and incorporated into plans for the next cycle of activity. Its principal feature is the reflection meeting – as much a time of joyous celebration as it is of serious consultation. Careful analysis of experience, through participatory discussions rather than overly complex and elaborate presentations, serves to maintain unity of vision, sharpen clarity of thought and heighten enthusiasm. Central to such an analysis is the review of vital statistics that suggest the next set of goals to be adopted. Plans are made that take into account increased capacity in terms of the human resources available at the end of the cycle to perform various tasks on the one hand, and accumulated knowledge about the receptivity of the population and the dynamics of teaching, on the other.
(The Universal House of Justice to the conference of the Continental Board of Counsellors, 27 December 2005)


Key to the progress of an intensive programme of growth is the phase dedicated to reflection, in which the lessons learned in action are articulated and incorporated into plans for the next cycle of activity. Its principal feature is the reflection meeting--as much a time of joyous celebration as it is of serious consultation. Careful analysis of experience, through participatory discussions rather than overly complex and elaborate presentations, serves to maintain unity of vision, sharpen clarity of thought and heighten enthusiasm. Central to such an analysis is the review of vital statistics that suggest the next set of goals to be adopted. Plans are made that take into account increased capacity in terms of the human resources available at the end of the cycle to perform various tasks, on the one hand, and accumulated knowledge about the receptivity of the population and the dynamics of teaching, on the other. When human resources increase in a manner proportionate to the rise in the overall Bahá’í population from cycle to cycle, it is possible not only to sustain but to accelerate growth.
(Universal House of Justice, 27 December 2005 To the Continental Boards of Counsellors)


Meetings of consultation held at the cluster level serve to raise awareness of possibilities and generate enthusiasm. Here, free from the demands of formal decision-making, participants reflect on experience gained, share insights, explore approaches and acquire a better understanding of how each can contribute to achieving the aim of the plan.
(The Universal House of Justice, messages to the Bahá’ís of the world, 17 January 2003)


Out of the occasional meetings of a few believers emerged the regular deliberations of an expanding core group of friends concerned with channelling into the field of service an increasing store of energy. As the process of growth continues to gather momentum, such an arrangement ultimately fails to satisfy the demands of planning and decision-making, and an Area Teaching Committee is constituted, and reflection meetings institutionalized.
(Universal House of Justice, a message to the conference of the Continental Board of Counsellors, 28 December 2010)


Reflection meetings/gatherings are carried out under the jurisdiction of the Regional Bahá’í Councils and are called by the Area Teaching Committee for each cluster.
(USA-NSA, Guidelines for Local Spiritual Assemblies, p. 16)


The meetings of reflection called at various intervals during the cycles should serve to reinforce an attitude of learning among the participants in the program so that any fear of failure or criticism gives way to the joy of earnest striving.
(Universal House of Justice to the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of Germany, 18 August 2005)