A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Science

‘Abdu’l-Bahá does often state that the medical science will much improve. With the appearance of every Revelation a new insight is created in man and this in turn expresses itself in the growth of science…What we see however is only the beginning. With the spiritual awakening of man this force will develop and marvelous results will become manifest.
(Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 297)


All the existing arts and sciences were once hidden secrets of nature. By his command and control of nature man took them out of the plane of the invisible and revealed them in the plane of visibility, whereas according to the exigencies of nature these secrets should have remained latent and concealed. According to the exigencies of nature electricity should be a hidden, mysterious power; but the penetrating intellect of man has discovered it, taken it out of the realm of mystery and made it an obedient human servant.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 81)


Arts, crafts and sciences uplift the world of being, and are conducive to its exaltation.
(Bahá’u’lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, p. 26)


As we are a religion and not qualified to pass on scientific matters we cannot sponsor different treatments.
(Shoghi Effendi, The Compilation of Compilations vol. I, p. 483)


In His Most Holy Book (the Aqdas) Bahá’u’lláh says to consult the best physicians in other words, doctors who have studied a scientific system of medicine: he never gave us to believe He Himself would heal us through ‘healers‘, but rather through prayer and the assistance of medicine and approved treatments.
(Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 277)


Is it not astonishing that although man has been created for the knowledge and love of God, for the virtues of the human world, for spirituality, heavenly illumination and eternal life, nevertheless, he continues ignorant and negligent of all this? Consider how he seeks knowledge of everything except knowledge of God. For instance, his utmost desire is to penetrate the mysteries of the lowest strata of the earth. Day by day he strives to know what can be found ten meters below the surface, what he can discover within the stone, what he can learn by archaeological research in the dust. He puts forth arduous labors to fathom terrestrial mysteries but is not at all concerned about knowing the mysteries of the Kingdom, traversing the illimitable fields of the eternal world, becoming informed of the divine realities, discovering the secrets of God, attaining the knowledge of God, witnessing the splendors of the Sun of Truth and realizing the glories of everlasting life. He is unmindful and thoughtless of these. How much he is attracted to the mysteries of matter, and how completely unaware he is of the mysteries of Divinity! Nay, he is utterly negligent and oblivious of the secrets of Divinity. How great his ignorance! How conducive to his degradation! It is as if a kind and loving father had provided a library of wonderful books for his son in order that he might be informed of the mysteries of creation, at the same time surrounding him with every means of comfort and enjoyment, but the son amuses himself with pebbles and playthings, neglectful of all his father’s gifts and provision. How ignorant and heedless is man! The Father has willed for him eternal glory, and he is content with blindness and deprivation. The Father has built for him a royal palace, but he is playing with the dust; prepared for him garments of silk, but he prefers to remain unclothed; provided for him delicious foods and fruits, while he seeks sustenance in the grasses of the field.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 226-227)


Much of the difficulty in applying science to development today has come from the failure to link science with the basic spiritual and moral values upon which each society is built. Such values, the basis for real progress in science and technology for development, are, in the Bahá’í view, derived from religion. Religion has traditionally provided standards and goals for the individual and society, but misunderstanding and distortion of its fundamental teachings have brought prejudice—dogmatism, superstition, fanaticism—all major hindrances to human development. On the other hand, scientific progress, without the religious values brought by the founders of the world’s revealed religions, has spawned materialism—greed, selfishness, distrust, injustice.
(Bahá’í International Community: http://www.upliftingwords.org/Articles/ScienceTechnology.htm)


Philosophy is of two kinds: natural and divine. Natural philosophy seeks knowledge of physical verities and explains material phenomena, whereas divine philosophy deals with ideal verities and phenomena of the spirit.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 326)


Religion and Science are inter-twined with each other and cannot be separated. These are the two wings with which humanity must fly. One wing is not enough. Every religion which does not concern itself with Science is mere tradition, and that is not the essential. Therefore science, education and civilization are most important necessities for the full religious life.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá in London, p. 28)


Religion is religion, as science is science. The one discerns and articulates the values unfolding progressively through Divine revelation; the other is the instrumentality through which the human mind explores and is able to exert its influence ever more precisely over the phenomenal world. The one defines goals that serve the evolutionary process; the other assists in their attainment. Together, they constitute the dual knowledge system impelling the advance of civilization. Each is hailed by the Master as an “effulgence of the Sun of Truth” (Universal House of Justice, One Common Faith, paragraph 45)


Science may be likened to a mirror wherein the images of the mysteries of outer phenomena are reflected. It brings forth and exhibits to us in the arena of knowledge all the product of the past. It links together past and present. The philosophical conclusions of bygone centuries, the teachings of the prophets and wisdom of former sages are crystallized and reproduced in the scientific advancement of today. Science is the discoverer of the past. From its premises of past and present we deduce conclusions as to the future. Science is the governor of nature and its mysteries, the one agency by which man explores the institutions of material creation.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Bahá’í World Faith, p. 242)


Scientific knowledge alone will lead to materialism.
(Adib Taherzadeh, The Revelation of Bahá’u’lláh v 1, p. 217)


Scientific knowledge is the highest attainment upon the human plane, for science is the discoverer of realities. It is of two kinds: material and spiritual. Material science is the investigation of natural phenomena; divine science is the discovery and realization of spiritual verities. The world of humanity must acquire both. A bird has two wings; it cannot fly with one. Material and spiritual science are the two wings of human uplift and attainment. Both are necessary—one the natural, the other supernatural; one material, the other divine. By the divine we mean the discovery of the mysteries of God, the comprehension of spiritual realities, the wisdom of God, inner significances of the heavenly religions and foundation of the law.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 138)


Shoghi Effendi, the Guardian of the Bahá’í Faith, described science and religion as “the two most potent forces in human life”.
(Shoghi Effendi, The World Order of Bahá’u’lláh p. 204)


Shoghi Effendi, in a letter written on his behalf, likened sciences that “begin with words and end with words” to “fruitless excursions into metaphysical hair-splittings", and, in another letter, he explained that what Bahá’u’lláh primarily intended by such “sciences” are “those theological treatises and commentaries that encumber the human mind rather than help it to attain the truth”.
(Shoghi Effendi, Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Endnote 110, p. 214)


Should myriads of men of learning, versed in logic, in the science of grammar, in law, in jurisprudence and the like, turn away from the Book of God, they would still be pronounced unbelievers.
(The Báb, Selections from the Writings of the Báb, p. 104)


The acquisition of sciences and the perfection of arts are considered acts of worship….
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Selections from the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 144)


The sciences and arts, all inventions, crafts, trades and their products have come forth from the intellect of man. It is evident that within the human organism the intellect occupies the supreme station. Therefore, if religious belief, principle or creed is not in accordance with the intellect and the power of reason, it is surely superstition.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 63)


The third Tajalli is concerning arts, crafts and sciences. Knowledge is as wings to man’s life, and a ladder for his ascent. Its acquisition is incumbent upon everyone. The knowledge of such sciences, however, should be acquired as can profit the peoples of the earth, and not those which begin with words and end with words. Great indeed is the claim of scientists and craftsmen on the peoples of the world.
(Bahá’u’lláh, Tablets of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 51-52)


This Day, O Shaykh, hath never been, nor is it now, the Day whereon man-made arts and sciences can be regarded as a true standard for men, since it hath been recognized that He Who was wholly unversed in any of them hath ascended the throne of purest gold, and occupied the seat of honor in the council of knowledge, whilst the acknowledged exponent and repository of these arts and sciences remained utterly deprived. By “arts and sciences” is meant those which begin with words and end with words. Such arts and sciences, however, as are productive of good results, and bring forth their fruit, and are conducive to the well-being and tranquility of men have been, and will remain, acceptable before God.
(Bahá’u’lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, p. 19)


This scientific power investigates and apprehends created objects and the laws surrounding them. It is the discoverer of the hidden and mysterious secrets of the material universe and is peculiar to man alone. The most noble and praiseworthy accomplishment of man, therefore, is scientific knowledge and attainment.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 29)


We may think of science as one wing and religion as the other; a bird needs two wings for flight, one alone would be useless. Any religion that contradicts science or that is opposed to it, is only ignorance—for ignorance is the opposite of knowledge.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Paris Talks, p. 130-131)


We noticed that he had enumerated some twenty or more sciences, the knowledge of which he considered to be essential for the comprehension of the mystery of the “Mi‘raj”. We gathered from his statements that unless a man be deeply versed in them all, he can never attain to a proper understanding of this transcendent and exalted theme. Among the specified sciences were the science of metaphysical abstractions, of alchemy, and natural magic. Such vain and discarded learnings, this man hath regarded as the pre-requisites of the understanding of the sacred and abiding mysteries of divine Knowledge.
(Bahá’u’lláh, Kitáb-i-Iqan, p. 185)


Weigh not the Book of God with such standards and sciences as are current amongst you, for the Book itself is the unerring Balance established amongst men.
(Bahá’u’lláh, Kitáb-i-Aqdas, p. 56)


With the love of God all sciences are accepted and beloved, but without it, are fruitless; nay, rather the cause of insanity. Every science is like unto a tree; if the fruit of it is the love of God, that is a blessed tree. Otherwise it is dried wood and finally a food for fire.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Bahá’í World Faith, p. 366)