A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Trustworthiness

Blessed be the soul that shineth with the light of trustworthiness among the people and becometh a sign of perfection amidst all men.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Compilation of Compilations vol II, p. 339)


Cling ye to the hem of virtue, and hold fast to the cord of trustworthiness and piety.
(Bahá’u’lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, p. 29)


He should not … say that which he will not fulfil.
(Bahá’í Scriptures, p. 50)


If a man in his own home doth not treat his relations and friends with entire trustworthiness and integrity, his dealings with the outside world—no matter how much trustworthiness and honesty he may bring to them—will prove barren and unproductive. First one should order one’s own domestic affairs, then attend to one’s business with the public.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Compilation of Compilations vol II, p. 339)


If a man were to perform every good work, yet fail in the least scruple to be entirely trustworthy and honest, his good works would become as dry tinder and his failure as a soul-consuming fire. If, on the other hand, he should fall short in all his affairs, yet act with trustworthiness and honesty, all his defects would ultimately be righted, all injuries remedied, and all infirmities healed. Our meaning is that, in the sight of God, trustworthiness is the bedrock of His Faith and the foundation of all virtues and perfections. A man deprived of this quality is destitute of everything.
(The Compilation of Compilations vol II, p. 339)


The goodliest vesture in the sight of God in this day is trustworthiness. All bounty and honour shall be the portion of the soul that arrayeth itself with this greatest of adornments.
(Bahá’u’lláh, The Compilation of Compilations vol II, p. 327)


Trustworthiness is one of the great qualities which must characterize Bahá’ís, and the new believer therefore, far from repudiating any commitments entered into before becoming a Bahá’í, must be ever more conscientious in discharging them.
(Universal House of Justice, Lights of Guidance, p. 144)


What shall faith and piety avail if trustworthiness be lacking? Of what consequence can they be? What benefit or advantage can they confer? Wherefore ‘Abdu’l-Bahá counselleth the friends—nay, rather, fervently imploreth them—so vigilantly to guard the sanctity of the Cause of God and preserve their own dignity as individuals that all nations shall come to know and honour them for their trustworthiness and integrity. They can render no greater service than this today. To act otherwise would be to take an axe to the root of the Cause of God—we take refuge with God from this heinous transgression and pray that He will protect His loved ones from committing so flagrant a wrong.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Compilation of Compilations vol II, p. 339-340)


You have written on the question of how the friends should proceed in their business dealings with one another. This is a question of the greatest importance and a matter that deserveth the liveliest concern. In relations of this kind, the friends of God should act with the utmost trustworthiness and integrity. To be remiss in this area would be to turn one’s face away from the counsels of the Blessed Beauty and the holy precepts of God.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Compilation of Compilations vol II, p. 339)