Abomination

Say: Verily, We have come unto you and have endured the abominations of the world because of your salvation. Do ye flee from Him who hath redeemed His soul for your lives? Fear God, O concourse of the Spirit, and follow not all learned men who are afar.

Bahá’u’lláh, Bahá’í Scriptures, p. 124

Abomination and misery are all you will harvest from fanaticism, from believing the foolish and the mindless.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Secret of Divine Civilization, p. 104-105

How long shall we drift on the wings of passion and vain desire; how long shall we spend our days like barbarians in the depths of ignorance and abomination? . . . How wretched and contemptible, if he shuts his eyes to the welfare of society and wastes his precious life in pursuing his own selfish interests and personal advantages . . . And this is man's uttermost wretchedness: that he should live inert, apathetic, dull, involved only with his own base appetites. When he is thus, he has his being in the deepest ignorance and savagery, sinking lower than the brute beasts. "They are like the brutes: Yea, they go more astray... For the vilest beasts in God's sight, are the deaf, the dumb, who understand not.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Secret of Divine Civilization, p. 2

O friends! Black clouds have shrouded all this earth, and the darkness of hatred and malice, of cruelty and aggression and defilement is spreading far and wide. The people, one and all, live out their lives in a heedless stupor and the chief virtues of man are held to be his rapacity and his thirst for blood . . . On that day will the weak of intellect draw on the bounty of the divine, Universal Mind, and they whose life is but abomination will seek out these cleansing, holy breaths.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Selections from the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 271-272

The heart must be sanctified from every form of selfishness and lust, for the weapons of the unitarians and the saints were and are the fear of God. That is the buckler which guardeth man from the arrows of hatred and abomination.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, A Traveller's Narrative, p. 45

The Messiah's sin-covering gaze did not for a moment dwell upon the repulsiveness of that carrion. The one element of that dead dog's carcass which was not abomination was the teeth: and Jesus looked upon their brightness. Thus is it incumbent upon us, when we direct our gaze toward other people, to see where they excel, not where they fail.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Selections from the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 169