Envy - Positive Aspects

If any man were to arise to defend, in his writings, the Cause of God against its assailants, such a man, however inconsiderable his share, shall be so honored in the world to come that the Concourse on high would envy his glory. No pen can depict the loftiness of his station, neither can any tongue describe its splendor. For whosoever standeth firm and steadfast in this holy, this glorious, and exalted Revelation, such power shall be given him as to enable him to face and withstand all that is in heaven and on earth. Of this God is Himself a witness.

Bahá’u’lláh, Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 330

In this moment the heart of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá is rejoiced at thy remembrance and he is writing an answer to thy letter so that thou mayest be so moved by the breezes of the love of God that thou mayest become the envy of the cypress of the rose-garden and cause joy, yearning, longing and ecstasy to the friends.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Tablets of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá v2, p. 449

O kind God! Make the souls the envy of the rose garden and the meadow.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 13

Strangers and outsiders are astonished at this love and radiant affection existing among the Bahá’ís. They inquire about it. They observe the unity and agreement manifest among them. They say, "What a beautiful spirit shines in their faces!" All envy it and wish that such a bond of love might be witnessed everywhere. Therefore, to you my first admonition is this: Associate most kindly with all; be as one family; pursue this same pathway. Let your intentions be one that your love may permeate and affect the hearts of others so that they may grow to love each other and all attain to this condition of oneness.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 336-337

The intellect, the wisdom of the individual members of this excellent nation dazzled the minds of other peoples, the brilliance and perceptive genius that characterized all this noble race aroused the envy of the whole world.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Secret of Divine Civilization, p. 7

These people are truly imbued with moral principles which are the envy of philosophers. They believe in God and fear Him. They have hopes in His favors; therefore, they shun all unworthy deeds and actions and incline to praiseworthy ethics and morals. Day and night they strive that their deeds may be commendable and that they may contribute to the welfare of humanity; therefore, each one of them is virtually a philosopher, for these people have attained unto that which is the essence and purport of philosophy.  These people have praiseworthy morals, even though they may be illiterate.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 85