Women

All should know, and in this regard attain the splendours of the sun of certitude, and be illumined thereby: Women and men have been and will always be equal in the sight of God. The Dawning-Place of the Light of God sheddeth its radiance upon all with the same effulgence. Verily God created women for men, and men for women. The most beloved of people before God are the most steadfast and those who have surpassed others in their love for God, exalted be His glory.

Bahá’u’lláh, The Compilation of Compilations vol II, p. 379

In response to a question concerning whether Bahá’u’lláh's injunction requires a wife and mother . . . to work for a livelihood, the Universal House of Justice has explained that Bahá’u’lláh's directive is for the friends to be engaged in an occupation which will profit themselves and others, and that homemaking is a highly honourable and responsible work of fundamental importance to society.

Bahá’u’lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, p. 193

O My handmaiden, O My leaf! Render thou thanks unto the Best-Beloved of the world for having attained this boundless grace at a time when the world's learned and most distinguished men have remained deprived thereof. We have designated thee 'a leaf' that thou mayest, like unto leaves, be stirred by the gentle wind of the Will of God -- exalted be His glory -- even as the leaves of the trees are stirred by onrushing winds. Yield thou thanks unto thy Lord by virtue of this brilliant utterance. Wert thou to perceive the sweetness of the title 'O My handmaiden' thou wouldst find thyself detached from all mankind, devoutly engaged day and night in communion with Him Who is the sole Desire of the world. In words of incomparable beauty We have made fitting mention of such leaves and handmaidens as have quaffed from the living waters of heavenly grace and have kept their eyes directed towards God. Happy and blessed are they indeed. Ere long shall God reveal their station whose loftiness no word can befittingly express nor any description adequately describe.

Bahá’u’lláh, Tablets of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 254

. . . we must declare that her capacity is equal, even greater than man's. This will inspire her with hope and ambition, and her susceptibilities for advancement will continually increase. She must not be told and taught that she is weaker and inferior in capacity and qualification. If a pupil is told that his intelligence is less than his fellow pupils, it is a very great drawback and handicap to his progress. He must be encouraged  to advance by the statement, "You are most capable, and if you endeavor, you will attain the highest degree."

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 76

. . . ye two pure beings are even as a single precious gem, ye are two boughs  branched from a single tree; ye both adore the same Beloved, ye both are longing for the same resplendent Sun. My hope is that all the handmaids of God . . . will unite like unto the waves of one unending sea; for although blown about as the wind listeth, these are separate in themselves, yet in truth are they all at one with the boundless deep.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Selections from the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 75

And among the teachings of Bahá’u’lláh is the equality of women and men. The world of humanity has two wings -- one is women and the other men. Not until both wings are equally developed can the bird fly. Should one wing remain weak, flight is impossible. Not until the world of women becomes equal to the world of men in the acquisition of virtues and perfections, can success and prosperity be attained as they ought to be.

‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Selections from the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 301